El Paso – the Microcosm of US-Mexico

epmcrocsm-usmx16There appears to be some confusion about the various topics that I choose to write about on my blog. Some readers have been taken aback by my missives about Donald Trump while the new readers are confused about my writings about the corruption in El Paso. The long-time readers know that the reason for my blog was the corruption that permeates throughout El Paso. I have been writing about it for about 17 years now. About five years ago, I started devoting a substantial amount of time to my blog posting a new post Monday through Friday for years now. I recently added a Sunday editorial cartoon segment as well. As I have written before, I have the luxury to focus more on my blog for two reasons – the first is that I live far enough out of El Paso that I am somewhat immune to the various forms of intimidation used by the corruptors to silence those exposing them. The second is that my business is successful enough that it gives me a comfortable life that allows me time to write.

As with everything else, the more practice I put into something the more it evolves. Thus, my blog has naturally evolved. El Paso was the genesis of the blog. El Paso is the natural genesis to what I am interested in writing about – border politics, corruption and immigration issues. El Paso is a microcosm to the geopolitics of the United States and Mexico.

It is natural that my writings evolve from El Paso-centric to the geopolitics of the border region. This is because what happens in El Paso, on the micro level, is representative of the macro experience of US-Mexico politics.

As a citizen of Mexico, who has lived in various countries, including the United States, I have developed an outsider’s perspective of what surrounds me. I see the world around me through a prism developed by my multiculturalism experience and my Mexican nationality in a foreign land.

I have first-hand experience of historical education derived from misguided nationalism that limits the understanding of the global politics that drive our existence. Many voters, who voted for Donald Trump, voted on a promise of new jobs not understanding that Trump could close all the borders and tax the multinationals and the job situation will not be resolved.

There is no longer the possibility of having an “America-first” doctrine. It is impossible.

This is because the economy of the world is so intertwined that to create an “America-first” policy will only result in substandard and over-priced consumer goods.

The electorate fell for the Donald Trump lies because the educational system failed to teach them that the United States is only one country in a world full of other economies each with their own interests.

The threat of radical Muslim terrorism cannot be ended in the United States simply by cutting off all immigration from Muslim countries. The vast majority of recent terrorism in the United States is home-grown terrorism perpetuated by US citizens.

It is these type of realities that need to be addressed. Knowledge is power.

As such, I will use my blog to continue to write about what I have always written about – border politics, corruption and immigration issues.

The only difference is that I am now focusing on a larger audience because the issues that affect El Paso, also affects Mexico and the United States. There are many interlinked events that create the reality that is today. El Paso, though, is the epicenter of all those topics, it has always been and will continue to be so for many years to come.

7 thoughts on “El Paso – the Microcosm of US-Mexico

  1. what don’t you understand that closed border means legal traffic continues via POEs, illegal traffic continues thru any means other than legal crossings. so explain how trade will be affected

  2. Martin, “homegrown terrorism” is a term developed by the media and government agencies. It is nothing really more than than what we always had, which is murder, assault, etc. Homegrown is very misleading and doesn’t define the intentions of an individual no matter where they are from. Would you say that a “terroristic” Islamic act is a US homegrown act? Since you have lived in many countries, you should know that no government favors the individual and will develop “false flags” in order to enslave their population to comply to infringing rules which the elites around the world don’t follow. You are right about El Paso being the microcosm of the elitism and the ruling class. It clearly shows by their actions.

  3. When I travel and people ask me about El Paso, I tell them it is the American face of Mexico, a Mexican city in the US – the Big Burrito. They get that.

  4. Terrorism in the US recently has been committed by extremists, Muslims mostly, who–whether “homegrown”, or not–have not adopted (or rejected) the political culture of the US. These people prefer Sharia law to our own Constitution.

    A populace that prefers their own political culture (including Mexicans) will only undermine the values that made this country appealing to them in the first place. Do we really want to “import” Mexican political values? That’s what they are exporting and what Trump tried to say so ineloquently .

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